Community Project Funding Requests - FY23

Rep. Trahan has submitted funding requests for community projects in Massachusetts’ Third Congressional District to the House Appropriations Committee.

Under guidelines issued by the Appropriations Committee, each Representative may request funding for up to 15 projects in fiscal year 2023. Projects are restricted to a limited number of federal funding streams, and only state and local governments and eligible non-profit entities are permitted to receive funding. Additional information on the reforms governing Community Project Funding is available here.

In compliance with House rules and Appropriations Committee requirements, Rep. Trahan has certified that neither she nor her immediate family has any financial interest in any of the projects she has requested. The submissions are listed in alphabetical order by city/town of the proposed recipient.

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[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Historic Asa Parlin House Restoration – Community and Cultural Center

Amount Requested: $1,540,000

Recipient: 

Town of Acton, Massachusetts 

472 Main Street, Acton, MA 01720 

Project Description: This funding will be used to restore the historic Asa Parlin house. It will also be used to provide event space to facilitate meetings, library programing and culture events, maintaining the historic integrity and visual impact from Woodbury Lane and restoring the appearance of the municipal complex that also has the Town Hall and Memorial Library. The Asa Parlin House is a contributing resource within the Acton Center Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house occupies a unique site within the community given its proximity to the Town Hall, the Library, and the Town Common. 

Justification: This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds as the project is responsive to identified community needs for additional meeting and cultural space. Once completed, this space will be used for cultural and community events, staff and committee meetings, as well housing art and exhibits. The landscape will be designed to encourage small and large gatherings with walkways connecting it to the Library and Town Hall, beautifying the entire Town Hall complex. The view from Woodbury will maintain its historic aesthetic while the home and surroundings will be fully accessible. Concurrently, the Acton Center and Acton Town Hall complex roadways are being reviewed for ways to implement roadway improvements, calming measures and maximizing parking. The similar timing of these two projects could allow for efficiencies and potential savings in parking lot design and construction and landscaping costs. 



[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Bridge To Bright Futures

Amount Requested: $331,110

Recipient: 

Minute Man Arc for Human Services

35 Forest Ridge Road, Concord, MA 01742

Project Description: This funding is to support “Bridge to Bright Futures,” a new project to address isolation, lack of congregate day services, and caregiver burden which continues during this post-COVID pandemic period for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Prior to COVID, I/DD, including those with autism, faced a workforce shortage in congregate day services and individual assistance (home, employment, or community mobility). These individuals also face significant bias reflected through health inequity, employment barriers, and implementation of inclusive education. The COVID pandemic increased risks and barriers faced by individuals (I/DD), as well as social isolation, resulting in regression of skills for a substantial portion of them. As of March 2022, 7,000 of the 19,500, day service participants (pre-shutdown) have not been able to return to congregate day or employment services in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. An additional number of students (most) who turned 22 years of age during the pandemic do not have congregate day support services. The major barrier is the lack of an adequate workforce. Not enough has been done for those 7,000 plus individuals and caregivers, who continue to carry the weight of responsibility. This project addresses the gaps in local problem solving and network building which continue. As of April 2022, most agencies are operating at 60% capacity. The funding will address the challenges facing the individuals and families which include a) lack of information, b) lack of meaningful day routine and training, c) lack of staff assistance and respite for caregivers, d) financial assistance, and e) benefits navigation. This project is a bridge which will partially address the gap that so many face. 

Justification: Building Brighter Futures address the isolation and separation from congregate day activities faced by more than 7,000 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities including autism. It also will assist families who are having to shoulder 24/7 responsibility for individuals who are losing out on skills and community integration. Many of these individuals and families will benefit by assistance to connect to community resources and their teams will help them develop individualized options.

Signed Disclosure Letter



[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Capping the Dracut Landfill 

Amount Requested: $1,500,000

Recipient: 

Town of Dracut, Massachusetts

62 Arlington Street, Dracut, MA 01826

Project Description: This funding will be used to cap the Dracut Landfill. The town had a Comprehensive Site Assessment (CSA) completed in 1997, which found that although there was no significant risk for human health, there was some ecological risk attributed to upgradient sources. Once capped, Dracut can repurpose the space.

Justification: This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds as this is not only an important environmental priority for the town, but will also allow the town to re-utilize valuable land. This includes expanding its DPW facilities, credit fields and other recreational facilities for the Town, which are limited due to site location and availability. 

Signed Disclosure Agreement




[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

The Winnekenni Recreation Area Improvements & Restoration Plan

Amount Requested: $700,000

Recipient: 

City of Haverhill  

4 Summer St., Haverhill MA  10830

Project Description: The purpose of the Winnekenni Park Recreation Area Improvement & Restoration Plan is to revitalize and expand the passive recreational opportunities, sports uses and cultural activities and programs for future generations of citizens of Haverhill and the many visitors who come to this area. With these improvements, the park will become a regional destination and economic development and cultural engine. 

Justification: The Covid-19 pandemic highlighted the need and importance for communities to have dedicated green spaces for all their citizens. Unfortunately, the ability for all citizens to have access to this type of space is not always equal. Often, low-income individuals and minorities have housing that lacks this dedicated outdoor living space (no back or front yards). Public parks can help provide a solution to the equity problems of outdoor space which is critical for social engagement, mental and physical health and access to clean air. In addition, parks provide children with opportunities for play, a critical piece of childhood development, especially for muscle strength, coordination, language, and cognitive abilities. Parks also build healthy communities by creating stable neighborhoods and strengthening community development.

Signed Disclosure Agreement




[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Community Health Connections Children’s Mental Health Services

Amount Requested: $2,500,000

Recipient: 

Community Health Connections, Inc.

326 Nichols Road, Fitchburg MA 01420

Project Description: This funding is to support the establishment of a dedicated service line for Children’s Mental Health. Services would include outpatient individual, family, and group therapy services (in-person and via telehealth), psychiatry, in-school therapy, therapeutic case management, peer mentoring, parenting classes, as well as consultation and training for local pediatrician offices, schools, juvenile courts, and local police departments.

Justification: This funding will allow Community Health Connections, Inc. (CHC), which has served as the only federally qualified community health center serving 35 cities and towns in North Central MA for the past 20 years, to create community-critical services that can be swiftly leveraged to support children and families struggling with mental health. This will meet a growing need for these services in our communities. It will provide these same services in its other locations in Gardner, Fitchburg and Leominster MA. This proposal will cover the recruitment, training and startup costs during the first year of operations. The need for additional mental health services for children has been an ongoing epidemic across the country, with studies indicating that 1) suicide is the second leading cause of death for children ages 10-14, with some deaths and suicide attempts in children as young as five years old and 2) that Emergency Room visits for children ages 5-11 have increased diagnoses of mental health conditions. The mental health services deficit has permeated MA, with studies showing that anxiety and depression, particularly for children of color ages 5-11, have been increasing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. With these shocking statistics, mental health services are needed now more than ever. Students who are reaching out for help - and the adults helping them - in MA are discouraged by wait times that are months and even a year long. This is indicative of what CHC is experiencing with patients in North Central MA, as its professionals reaching out to local child clinics and supporting community partners with patient referrals and appointments are being told that scheduling mental health appointments for children could be up to one year ahead.

Signed Disclosure Letter

 

[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Fitchburg Theater Block

Amount Requested: $2,000,000

Recipient: 

Fitchburg State University

160 Pearl Street, Fitchburg, MA, 01420

Project Description: This funding is to support economic development and revitalization efforts in downtown Fitchburg, MA through the development of Fitchburg’s Theater Block in the Upper Common Historic District. Specifically, the funding will be used for the construction of a black box theater known as the theaterLAB. It will serve as a teaching and community facility for the University’s performing arts students and for use by the general public. The theaterLAB will strengthen learning opportunities for students and community members with space for performances, academic experiences, and speaking events.

Justification: This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds as it is a part of Fitchburg’s plans to revitalize and develop its downtown area. The location of the theaterLAB will make it an inclusive and collaborative learning/performance facility, which is open to the public, and will draw in community members who might not otherwise engage in University-sponsored events, allowing FSU to integrate the diverse neighborhoods around Main Street and promote equity of access to arts and humanities programming. Further, the theaterLAB will spur critical economic revitalization, with the UMass Donahue Institute projecting the creation of 43 jobs and $5.3 million in output per year. This is particularly important when considering that this neighborhood is home to one of the most diverse and impoverished populations in the region.

Signed Disclosure Agreement



[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Evergreen Grove – Care Farming Program for Individuals with SUD and MH Disorders

Amount Requested: $200,000

Recipient: 

GAAMHA INC.

208 Coleman St. Gardner, MA 01440 

Project Description: This funding is to support an exciting and innovative new program using an alternative approach in the battle against substance misuse and mental health challenges. While our nation has increased investment every year in this fight, effectiveness has not kept pace with spending. GAAMHA’s solution to this problem is to provide an alternative setting and approach, while still embracing the evidenced based practices that are shown to be effective interventions when people remain engaged in those programs. For the last five years, GAAMHA has been operating a therapeutic farm in North Central Massachusetts. Its new location, named Evergreen Grove, is host to The Carl E. Dahl House. Dahl House, a 16-bed residential facility for adult men that is licensed by MA DPH as a Co-Occurring Enhanced Recovery Home. Evergreen Grove is also the home of GAAMAH’s livestock rescue operation where they create forever homes for over 70 different animals who have been abused, neglected, and abandoned. GAAMAH is launching a new program called R.O.O.T.S (Resilient, Optimistic, Open-Minded, Thriving, Serene) which takes this same Care Farming model and offers it to 12–24 year-old participants on an outpatient basis. The programs are staffed by master’s level clinicians, as well as peers in long term recovery from mental health and substance use disorders. Participants take part in animal care activities, equine assisted learning, barn work, horticulture, and are able to take advantage of their 100 acre privately owned forest and its hiking trails and peaceful atmosphere. The Green Care modality has been in use for a long time in Northern Europe and data from those countries shows rates of retention that average 4-5x longer than traditional outpatient therapies. 

Justification: The issues of substance misuse and mental health are topics around nearly every dinner table in every household in North Central Massachusetts. The target audience for this program are people either diagnosed with SUD or MH issues, or considered to be at risk for these conditions. This includes young people, ages 12-24, who are struggling at school and/or home due to these issues. Suicide rates for the region far outpace the rest of the state and overdose rates continue to rise. Existing options for both adults and young people are scarce and ineffective, and their innovative approach is in high demand. This project will greatly increase the number of opportunities for more and more young people to engage with this exciting new option and give hope to those individuals, their families, schools, employers, and the entire community.

Signed Disclosure Agreement



[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory

Amount Requested: $1,000,000

Recipient: 

Lawrence General Hospital 

1 General Street, Lawrence, MA 01841

Project Description: This request is for funding to replace Lawrence General Hospital’s (LGH) imaging equipment in its Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory to diagnose and treat heart conditions such as clogged arteries or irregular heartbeats. During cardiac catheterization, cardiologists test the heart and deliver treatments such as coronary angioplasty and coronary stenting. With more than 70,000 emergency visits each year, cardiac care is a critical component of Lawrence General’s care delivery. Patients who present to the LGH Emergency Center with a cardiac issue often require a cardiac catheterization, a procedure in which a thin, flexible tube (catheter) is guided through a blood vessel to the heart to diagnose or treat certain heart conditions. It is imperative that LGH replace their current equipment with new equipment which will be in service for the next decade, and ensure that the community has access to diagnostic and emergency cardiac care for underserved populations. The Cardiac Cath Lab at LGH was established in 1992 and has been recognized as a leader in cardiovascular care. The Lab was recognized as a top facility for cardiovascular care in the 2022 edition of U.S. News & World Report's "Best Hospitals" guide. Over the course of the Lab's history, LGH has committed to high levels of performance evaluation and reporting, along with iterative processes of improvement. As a result, LGH’s Cardiac Cath Lab is among the most thoroughly accredited and recognized hospitals in MA - - even more than similar labs in Boston. Through the American College of Cardiology, LGH’s Lab holds Chest Pain, Cath Lab, and Heart Failure Accreditations (the only hospital in MA with this accreditation). LGH is also one of only a few hospitals recognized with the HeartCARE Center National Distinction of Excellence. It is imperative that patients who receive care at LGH’s Cardiac Cath Lab have access to the best diagnostic imaging technology available. The proposed new technology will increase the number and type of procedures LGH can carry out, reducing patient time on the table, and reducing radiation exposure to patients and clinicians alike. By providing the highest quality imaging and care, this equipment will improve accuracy, safety, and patient experience and health outcomes.

Justification: This funding will allow LGH to acquire enhanced diagnostic cardiac equipment that it would not otherwise have the financial capacity to acquire. The new equipment will improve the diagnostic capability of LGH and ensure the community has access to better equipment, close to home, when minutes saves lives. The funding will improve health outcomes for patients experiencing a cardiac event in a large, diverse, low income community of color, that would otherwise be diagnosed with older technology, during a more extended time frame with a higher degree of radiation, rather than state-of-the-art new equipment with higher diagnostic capabilities.

Signed Disclosure Agreement




[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Ellen Swallow Richards Park and Island Parkside Open Space and Recreation Plan

Amount Requested: $2,116,000

Recipient: 

Lawrence CommunityWorks Inc.

168 Newbury St., Lawrence, MA, 01841

Project Description: This funding will complete the transformational redevelopment of Lawrence, MA’s East Island neighborhood from neglected post-industrial wasteland to vibrant mixed-use community. Funding will support increased access to open space, youth recreation opportunities, and stable, energy-efficient, climate-resilient, affordable family housing, by providing the final site components for this project. This funding includes the integration of active recreational amenities into the recently-developed Ellen Swallow Richards Park, currently a passive urban wild on a former manufacturing site. These public amenities will be accessible to the entire community, not just those living in the new neighboring housing developments. It will also provide funding for the New Balance Foundation Squashbusters Lawrence recreation center, which will be integrated into the Island Parkside Phase 2 affordable housing development adjacent to the ESR park, and provides a permanent Lawrence home for a successful urban youth program that combines the sport of squash with academic and leadership development opportunities. 

Justification: This funding is a valuable use of taxpayer funds as it will complete the transformation of a key new, equitable, diverse neighborhood in one of the poorest cities in Massachusetts. Adding important recreational and open space amenities cannot be afforded by the housing project budget, yet they are critical to creating a healthy, nurturing environment that goes beyond simply warehousing people in affordable units – it gives them a neighborhood in which to thrive.

Signed Disclosure Agreement



[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

3D Mammography System Acquisition 

Amount Requested: $450,000

Recipient: 

UMassMemorial Health - HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital

60 Hospital Road, Leominster, MA 01453

Project Description: This funding is to acquire and install a 3D Mammography System (digital breast tomosynthesis) to increase cancer screening rates for women. This funding will enable the acquisition and installation of a digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to replace an aging full-field digital mammography located on the Fitchburg Campus. The Hospital is committed to increasing access to those most vulnerable populations that historically do not access life-saving screening resources. Therefore, an important goal of this project is to reduce the health disparities of marginalized populations in Fitchburg and the surrounding area. Annually, the hospital provides mammography services, both screening and diagnostic, for over 12,000 patients. As the safety net provider in the Fitchburg/Leominster area, they would be able to utilize this funding to provide high-quality imaging for the patients in the region. They are the lowest cost provider in the region and would be able to utilize the lower internal capital expenditures to improve the social determinants of health in the community and to ensure their facility is stable for many years to come. Barriers to access, including transportation, insurance, and primary care access, can cause decreased screening and diagnostic imaging rates. In turn, this can lead to delays in diagnosis that cause increased morbidity and mortality due to breast cancer. To reduce barriers and address health equity, the new DBT will be installed in the mammography unit within the new Outpatient Palliative Care and Wellness Center, conveniently located on the second floor of the Simonds-Sinon Regional Cancer Center at the Hospital’s Fitchburg campus. This location is on the public transportation route and adjacent to the federally qualified 330 Health Center; the Hospital’s Fitchburg Family Practice and UMass Memorial Health’s Residency Program. Effective breast cancer screening should depict cancer at an early stage while reducing the incidence of advanced cancer. Mammography screening generally reduces breast cancer mortality by enabling early cancer detection, and it is the current standard for screening women at average risk. DBT is an advanced mammographic technique that allows tomographic images to be acquired in a conventional mammography view. DBT can improve the radiologist’s ability to find breast cancer.

Justification: The acquisition and installation of a digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) would be a good use of government funding as this hospital is the safety net provider in the Leominster/Fitchburg area and would be able to utilize this funding to provide high-quality imaging for the patients in the region. Mammography screening generally reduces breast cancer mortality by enabling early cancer detection, and it is the current standard for screening women at average risk. The hospital is also the lowest cost provider in the region and would be able to utilize the lower internal capital expenditures to improve the social determinants of health in the community and to ensure their facility is stable for many years to come.

 

[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Martin/Cawley Complex Renovation

Amount Requested: $3,000,000

Recipient: 

Lowell Athletics and Activities Foundation Inc.

39 Perron Way, Lowell MA 01854

Project Description: The funding for this project will assist with the renovation of the stadium grandstands and locker rooms, which is Phase II in the renovations and rehabilitation of the 68 acre Martin Athletic Complex. The grandstands, built in 1937 as a WPA project, have provided fans of Lowell High School and countless other activities a venue to cheer on local athletes and performers for 85 years. The next steps in this renovation project include a new fieldhouse/youth center, walking and biking trails, a playground, and aquatics center. However, these are not feasible without first ensuring the grandstands are able to provide a safe, ADA compliant viewing experience for the public.

Justification: This is a valuable use of taxpayer dollars as the complex is one of the most utilized public spaces in the Greater Lowell area.  The Lowell Athletics and Activities Foundation supports the municipal and local non-profit communities' continued dedication to providing the children of Lowell and the surrounding area a fun, safe environment for teams and individuals of all kinds to perform. Supporting such a diverse population through education, infrastructure, and social services puts a large strain on a municipal budget. This project provides vital community resources that will allow for the continued promotion of diverse education and improved health of young people.

Signed Disclosure Agreement



[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Boys & Girls Clubs Build Better Workforces

Amount Requested: $2,500,000

Recipient: 

Boys & Girls Club of Greater Lowell, Inc.

657 Middlesex St, Lowell, MA 01851

Project Description: This funding is to support workforce development for local youth and will be divided between the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lowell, Lawrence, Haverhill, Metrowest, and Gardner. When every young person has access to quality out-of-school opportunities that intentionally support workforce readiness, they are well-positioned to succeed. These Clubs employ the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s (BGCA) evidence-informed approach to workforce development, which is built on three pillars proven to be most effective in workforce training and career-education programs:

  • Career Exploration and Matching: Youth explore various career clusters and education and training required for various pathways. They also reflect on their strengths, interests, and passions as staff guide them in matching their futures to potential careers.

  • Skills Development: Through a focus on essential workplace skills, youth gain knowledge and build abilities valued by employers – e.g., communication, active listening, collaboration, setting priorities, professionalism, and ethical behavior.

  • Work-Based Learning Experiences: BGCA programs such as Junior Staff and partnerships with community organizations provide access for youth to gain real-world work experience and job-readiness skills through internships, summer jobs, or other part-time employment.

By providing opportunities for professional growth and advancement, this project will result in job retention, job growth, and/or increased wages.This investment in improving youth and employee skills will take place in collaboration with agencies including MassHire Career Centers, Young Adult Career Centers, and the Massachusetts Workforce Training Fund.

Justification: This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because workforce development is critical for national recovery and long-term economic success, particularly for young adults from low-income backgrounds. This project includes workforce, skills-building, and career pathways strategies to provide on-ramps to employment and keep young people connected to work or school.

Signed Disclosure Agreement



[Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Lowell Ending Trafficking of Youth

Amount Requested: $505,813

Recipient: 

The Center for Hope and Healing, Inc. 

21 George Street, Suite 400, Lowell, MA 01852

Project Description: This funding is to support the Lowell Ending Trafficking of Youth (LET YOUTH), a project that provides comprehensive services to address the needs for safety, security, and healing to all minor survivors of human trafficking, particularly sex trafficking, in the Greater Lowell areas. This project implements integrated survivor-centered services that include reunification with healthy family members and caregivers, which is a critical exit-ramp, and crucial to a minor’s long-term success and self-sufficiency to reduce the likelihood of further trafficking victimization. This project will also support a coordinated taskforce to combat trafficking of minors.

Justification: The project is currently serving a number of youth who are “aging out”, and are transitioning out from state custody or foster care, and see that they are now also at risk of homelessness. They also have higher rates of incidence of juvenile justice involvement, making it difficult for them to obtain employment. Some of these young people also lack post secondary education, making them more vulnerable to trafficking, revictimization and trauma. The availability of workforce development and job readiness programs is a high need for transition aged youth. Supporting them to establish financial stability and security through job training and soft skills development creates pathways for change in the community for youth who comprise this portion of our community’s population.



[Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

1301 Middlesex Family Shelter Acquisition Project

Amount Requested: $3,000,000

Recipient: 

Community Teamwork, Inc.

155 Merrimack Street, Lowell, MA 01852

Project Description: The funds will be used to purchase the property located at 1301 Middlesex Street in Lowell, Massachusetts, which the agency is currently renting for program space, to provide emergency housing for families through the state’s Emergency Assistance Family Shelter Program. 1301 Middlesex Street is a 3-story garden style multi-family building. The property offers 18 apartments with a gross square footage of 15,293 of living space. 17 of the apartments are permitted as two-bedroom and one unit is a studio apartment. One first floor unit is fully ADA compliant and the other five units on the first floor are accessible for individuals with disabilities. The property has an onsite parking lot which offers 20 parking spaces for residents and property management staff as well as a wheelchair accessible entry to the first floor. The entire building has central air throughout and is along public transportation routes.

Justification: Currently, this property is being used by Community Telework Inc. (CTI) as emergency housing for families. The Massachusetts Commonwealth has also administered a statewide shelter program, showing how critical it is that the state and key community stakeholders provide safe shelter to families and support them in their pathway to stable housing. In particular, as BIPOC households are more likely to experience homelessness in CTI’s geographic region, providing high-quality emergency shelter has an outsized impact for the BIPOC community. As such, providing this consolidated scattered site model of family shelter is a priority. The proposed project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds as it supports a program goal to place 68 families into permanent housing. By providing consolidated scattered site emergency housing, a model rooted in best practices and improved program outcomes, these families are in a better position to exit shelter into stable housing.

Signed Disclosure Agreement




[Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee]

Central Street Water Main Replacement and Upgrade

Amount Requested: $494,950

Recipient: 

Town of Winchendon

109 Front Street, Winchendon, MA 01475 

Project Description: This request is for funding to replace approximately 900 feet of existing water main. This current pipe is 10” to 6” in size, over a hundred years in age, and urgently needs replacing. The lower portion of Central Street is currently being replaced with a 12” pipe to meet the demands of the system. The proposed main that will be replaced is also a transmission main, which feeds the town and helps with the pressures in the system. While the current main is to be replaced in multiple sections, there will be a surge of water from the larger 12” pipe to the 10” pipe back to the 12” pipe causing turbidity in the water. Replacing the water main will provide water users in Winchendon better water and a more constant pressure. 

Justification: This funding will close a necessary loop for the Town of Winchendon water users to create a higher quality system. The main line replacement project will increase water quality by decreasing water turbidity, and improve water pressure for the system and fire suppression. The project will also connect the houses from Maple St to the tank so the Town and the water system users are not unnecessarily paying to maintain two separate systems.

Signed Disclosure Agreement


Click here to access FY22 Community Project Funding Requests.